Program

The program for AusCTW 2018 is below including keynotes, invited speakers, poster sessions and presentations for best thesis prize.

Wednesday
31 January 2018
Thursday
1 February 2018
Friday
2 February 2018
8:15 AM – 9:00 AMRegistration Opens
9:00 AM – 9:10 AMConference OpeningAnnouncementsAnnouncements
9:10 AM – 10:10 AMKeynote Talk 1
Prof. Branka Vucetic
Keynote Talk 2
Prof. Aditya Ramamoorthy
Keynote Talk 3
Dr. Alex Grant
10:10 AM – 10:40 AMMorning TeaMorning TeaMorning Tea
10:40 AM – 11:00 AMProf. Jinhong Yuan
Dr. Hazer Inaltekin
Prof. Jamie Evans
11:00 AM – 11:20 AMDr. Siu-Wai Ho
Dr. Nguyen H. Tran
Dr. Saman Atapattu
11:20 AM – 11:40 AMDr. Sachini Jayasooriya
Presentations by
Shortlisted Candidates for
Best Thesis Prize
Dr. Hajime Suzuki
11:40 AM – 12:00 PMDr. Marco Tomamichel
Prof. Mike Faulkner
12:00 PM – 1:30 PMLunchLunchClose
1:30 PM – 3:10 PMPoster Session 1Poster Session 2
3:10 PM – 3:40 PMAfternoon TeaAfternoon Tea
3:40 PM – 4:00 PMProf. Emanuele Viterbo
Prof. Zixiang Xiong
4:00 PM – 4:20 PMDr. Salman Durrani
Prof. Iain Collings
4:20 PM – 4:40 PMDr. Jun Tong
Dr. Graeme Woodward
4:40 PM – 5:00 PMDr. Wanchun Liu
Dr. Jing Guo
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM
6:30 PM – 9:30 PMBanquet
(including awards)

Keynote Speakers

Keynote 1

Research Directions in Wireless Communications

Prof. Branka Vucetic
The University of Sydney
Abstract: The talk will focus on challenges and research opportunities in future wireless communication systems. In particular, open research problems, for meeting stringent latency, reliability and scalability requirements in emerging IoT communications, will be considered. Telecommunication networks generate and capture massive amounts of data, which could be used for optimising their operations. The talk will consider research directions for developing automated configuration of communication devices and systems based on machine learning methods.
Speaker's Biography: Branka Vucetic is an ARC Laureate Fellow and Director of the Centre of Excellence for IoT and Telecommunications at the University of Sydney. Her current work is in the areas of wireless networks and Internet of Things. In the area of wireless networks, she explores possibilities of millimetre wave (mmWave) frequency bands. In the area of the Internet of things, Vucetic works on providing wireless connectivity for mission critical applications. Branka Vucetic is a Fellow of IEEE, the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and the Australian Academy of Science.

Keynote 2

Combinatorial Designs for Distributed Storage, Caching and Computation

Prof. Aditya Ramamoorthy
Iowa State University, USA
Abstract: Combinatorial design theory has its roots in recreational mathematics and is concerned with the arrangement of the elements of a finite set into subsets, such that the collection of subsets has certain “nice” properties. In this talk we shall demonstrate that interpreting designs in the right manner yields nontrivial results in several different areas that have been of recent interest. We will demonstrate that combinatorial designs allow us to design efficient large scale distributed storage systems. Specifically, upon node failure these systems can be repaired by simply downloading packets from the surviving nodes. The technique of coded caching promises huge reductions in the induced traffic in content caching networks. However, the original scheme requires the stored files to be split into a number of parts (i.e., the subpacketization level) that grows exponentially in the problem parameters. Our work constructs designs that allow us to obtain practical schemes with reduced subpacketization. Finally, we will show that designs can be used to construct a family of directed acyclic networks that have several interesting properties. In particular, our work shows that the computation rate of such networks depends significantly on the source alphabets. This is in stark contrast with multiple unicast networks where the rate is independent of the source alphabet.
Speaker's Biography: Aditya Ramamoorthy is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Iowa State University. He received his B. Tech. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi in 1999 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2002 and 2005 respectively. He was a systems engineer at Biomorphic VLSI Inc. till 2001. From 2005 to 2006 he was with the data storage signal processing group at Marvell Semiconductor Inc. His research interests are in the areas of network information theory, channel coding and signal processing for bioinformatics and nanotechnology. Dr Ramamoorthy served as an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications from 2011 — 2015. He is currently serving as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. He is the recipient of the 2012 Iowa State University’s Early Career Engineering Faculty Research Award, the 2012 NSF CAREER award, and the Harpole-Pentair professorship in 2009 and 2010.

Keynote 3

Small Data using the World's Biggest Software Defined Radio

Dr. Alex Grant
Myriota Pty Ltd.
Abstract: In this talk I will give an overview of Myriota’s internet of things service which used low earth orbit nanosatellites to provide global, low cost connectivity to inexpensive long battery life ground-based devices. I’ll also talk a bit about pathway to commercialisation and industry-based research.
Speaker's Biography: Alex Grant used to be a researcher at UniSA. Then he was a researcher at Cohda Wireless. Now he is a researcher at Myriota Pty Ltd.

Invited Talks

Session 1: Coding and Information Theory

Talk 1 - A Lattice-Partition Framework of Downlink Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access without SIC

Prof. Jinhong Yuan
University of New South Wales
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Abstract: In this talk, a novel lattice-partition-based downlink non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) framework is proposed. This framework is motivated by recognizing the algebraic structure behind the NOMA scheme as a lattice partition. The schemes in the proposed framework enjoy many desirable properties such as explicit and systematic design and discrete input distributions. The rates achieved by the proposed scheme with any base lattice and with single-user decoding (i.e., without successive interference cancellation SIC ) are analyzed and an universal upper bound on the gap to the multiuser capacity is obtained as a function of the normalized second moment of the base lattice. Since the proposed framework has a substantially larger design space than that of previous work whose base lattice is an one-dimensional lattice, one can easily find instances in larger dimensions that can provide superior performance. Design examples with the base lattices A2, D4, E8, and Construction A lattices, respectively, are provided and both the analytic bounds and simulation results exhibit a smaller gap as dimensions increase.
Speaker's Biography: Jinhong Yuan (M’02–SM’11–F’16) received the B.E. and Ph.D. degrees in electronics engineering from the Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China, in 1991 and 1997, respectively. From 1997 to 1999, he was a Research Fellow with the School of Electrical Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. In 2000, he joined the School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney, where he is currently a Telecommunications Professor with the School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications. He has authored two books, three book chapters, over 200 papers in telecommunications journals and conference proceedings, and 40 industrial reports. He is a Co-Inventor of one patent on MIMO systems and two patents on low-density-parity-check codes. His current research interests include error control coding and information theory, communication theory, and wireless communications. He was a recipient of three Best Paper Awards and one Best Poster Award, including the Best Paper Award from the IEEE Wireless Communications and Networking Conference, Cancun, Mexico, in 2011, and the Best Paper Award from the IEEE International Symposium on Wireless Communications Systems, Trondheim, Norway, in 2007. He served as the IEEE NSW Chair of the Joint Communications/Signal Processions/Ocean Engineering Chapter from 2011 to 2014. He is currently serving as an Associate Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS.

Talk 2 - Coding and Bounds for Channel Estimation in Visible Light Communications and Positioning

Dr. Siu-Wai Ho
University of South Australia
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Abstract: In visible light communications (VLC) and visible light positioning (VLP), it is essential to obtain accurate estimates of the channel gains between receiver and multiple light sources. When there are multiple transmitters, time-division multiple access (TDMA) is typically used in the channel estimation phase of radio frequency systems. However, the estimation performance of TDMA-based schemes in VLC and VLP systems is substantially impacted by the maximum power constraint and desired average power constraint that are unique to visible light systems. Under these constraints, this talk explores coding schemes for the simultaneous channel gain estimations of multiple light sources such that the total and maximum noise variances of the channel estimates by the receiver are minimized. Although the minimization problem is non-convex, sufficient conditions for optimal codes are found by using majorisation theory. Coding scheme satisfying these conditions is proposed that characterises the fundamental tradeoff between noise variance and codeword length.
Speaker's Biography: Siu-Wai Ho received the B.Eng., M.Phil., and Ph.D. degrees in Information Engineering from The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, in 2000, 2003, and 2006, respectively. From 2006 to 2008, he was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA. In 2009, he joined the Institute for Telecommunications Research, University of South Australia (UniSA), Adelaide, SA, Australia. His current research interests include information theory, indoor positioning, visible light communications, information-theoretic security, and biometric security systems. Dr Ho received the Croucher Foundation Fellowship from 2006 to 2008, the 2008 Young Scientist Award from the Hong Kong Institution of Science, UniSA Research SA Fellowship from 2010 to 2013, and the Australian Research Council Australian Post-Doctoral Fellowship from 2010 to 2013. His project received the 2016 National iAward–consumer category from the Australian Information Industry Association. His papers received the Best Paper Award at the IEEE/IET International Symposium on Communication Systems, Networks and Digital Signal Processing 2016 and the Best Student Paper Award in the 2016 Australian Communication Theory Workshop. With his PhD student, his project received an honorary mention in the 2015 ComSoc Student Competition Communications Technology Changing the World organized by the IEEE Communications Society.

Talk 3 - Multi-Edge Type Density Evolution: Applications to Raptor Code Design

Dr. Sachini Jayasooriya
The University of Newcastle
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Abstract: Raptor codes, which have been inspired by the idea of rateless coding, are formed as a serial concatenation of an inner Luby Transform (LT) code with an outer code, usually a high-rate low-density parity-check (LDPC) code. The design of Raptor codes with binary modulation for different binary channels has been well investigated in literature. In contrast, there has been less progress on universal design methods for Raptor codes for the Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) channel with binary and higher-order modulation, and a comprehensive analysis of the asymptotic performance of Raptor codes is still missing. In this work, we propose a more general design framework for Raptor codes using a multi-edge framework. This multi-edge representation gives a general framework to analyze and design Raptor codes for binary and higher-order modulation over the AWGN channel using the multi-edge type density evolution. In this talk, we will present recent results on Raptor codes obtained using the multi-edge framework.
Speaker's Biography: Sachini Jayasooriya received the B.Sc. degree (1st honors) in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, in 2011 and the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 2017. She is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Her research interests include information and coding theory, error correction codes, wireless communication, and machine-to-machine communications.

Talk 4 - Quantum Communication: From Basic Science to Engineering

Dr. Marco Tomamichel
University of Technology Sydney
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Abstract: I will give an overview over recent progress in quantum information and communication theory and discuss some of the big remaining open questions.
Speaker's Biography: I am an Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) fellow and Senior Lecturer with the Centre for Quantum Software and Information at the University of Technology Sydney. I received a Master of Science degree from the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at ETH Zurich, and a doctorate in Theoretical Physics also from ETH Zurich. Before joining the University of Sydney as a University of Sydney Postdoctoral Fellow, I have worked as a Research Fellow and Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Quantum Technologies in Singapore.

Session 2: Advanced Signal Processing

Talk 5 - Analog Beamforming with Discrete Phase Shifters for Millimeter Wave Communications

Prof. Emanuele Viterbo
Monash University
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Abstract: We consider millimeter wave multiuser uplink system with low resolution phase shifters, where users transmit simultaneously to base station. Transmit and receive beamforming through large antenna arrays is used to compensate severe path loss of millimeter waves. We first propose a joint precoder and detector design based on the low-complexity local search algorithm that iteratively finds the preferred transmit and receive beamforming vectors, which maximizes the sum-rate of the multiuser uplink system. Although the joint design achieves similar sum-rate to a fully digital system, the computation complexity to determine good beamforming vectors is high. To reduce complexity, we then propose non-joint designs of precoder and detector. For the precoder design, the transmit beamforming vectors are chosen to maximize either the signal to noise ratio (SNR) or the signal to interference plus noise ratio (SINR) of each user. For the detector design, the receiver beamforming vectors are selected using either an approximate ML detector (AMLD) or a successive cancellation detector (SCD). Through simulations, we show that our designs with low resolution phase shifters outperform the traditional methods using steering vectors as beamforming vectors with high resolution phase shifters.
Speaker's Biography: Emanuele Viterbo (M’95–SM’04–F’11) is currently a Professor in the ECSE Department and an Associate Dean in Graduate Research at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. He received his Ph.D. in 1995 in Electrical Engineering, from the Politecnico di Torino, Torino, Italy. From 1990 to 1992 he was with the European Patent Office, The Hague, The Netherlands, as a patent examiner in the field of dynamic recording and error-control coding. Between 1995 and 1997 he held a post-doctoral position in the Dipartimento di Elettronica of the Politecnico di Torino. In 1997-98 he was a post-doctoral research fellow in the Information Sciences Research Center of AT&T Research, Florham Park, NJ, USA. From 1998-2005, he worked as Assistant Professor and then Associate Professor, in Dipartimento di Elettronica at Politecnico di Torino. From 2006-2009, he worked in DEIS at University of Calabria, Italy, as a Full Professor. Prof. Viterbo is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher since 2009. He was an Associate Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, the European Transactions on Telecommunications and the Journal of Communications and Networks, and Guest Editor for the IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN SIGNAL PROCESSING: Special Issue on Managing Complexity in Multiuser MIMO Systems. Prof. Viterbo was awarded a NATO Advanced Fellowship in 1997 from the Italian National Research Council. His main research interests are in lattice codes for the Gaussian and fading channels, algebraic coding theory, algebraic space-time coding, digital terrestrial television broadcasting, digital magnetic recording, and irregular sampling.

Talk 6 - Design of Non-orthogonal Multiple Access Enhanced Backscatter Communication

Dr. Salman Durrani
The Australian National University
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Abstract: Backscatter communication (BackCom) allows a backscatter node (BN) to communicate with the reader by modulating and reflecting the incident continuous wave from the reader. In this talk, we consider a single BackCom system, where multiple BNs are served by a reader. We propose to use the power-domain non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) to enhance the spectrum efficiency of the BackCom system. To better exploit power-domain NOMA, we propose to set the reflection coefficients for multiplexed BNs to be different. Based on this considered model, we develop the reflection coefficient selection criteria. To illustrate the enhanced system with the proposed criteria, we analyze the performance of BackCom system in terms of the average number of bits that can be successfully decoded by the reader for two-node pairing. Our results show the advantage of applying NOMA to the BackCom system.
Speaker's Biography: Salman Durrani received the B.Sc. (1st class honours) degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Engineering & Technology, Lahore, Pakistan in 2000. He received the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia in Dec. 2004. He has been with the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, since 2005, where he is currently Associate Professor in the Research School of Engineering, College of Engineering & Computer Science. His research interests are in wireless communications and signal processing, including machine-to-machine communication, wireless information and power transfer, stochastic geometry modelling of finite area networks and synchronization in communication systems. He was a recipient of the 2016 IEEE ComSoc Asia Pacific Outstanding Paper Award. He was the Chair of the ACT Chapter of the IEEE Signal Processing and Communications Societies from 2015 to 2016. He currently serves as an Editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS. He was a recipient of the 2012 ANU Vice Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence. He is a Member of Engineers Australia and a Senior Fellow of The Higher Education Academy, UK.

Talk 7 - Regularized Estimators for MIMO Communications

Dr. Jun Tong
University of Wollongong
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Abstract: Channel estimation and signal detection are key signal processing tasks for MIMO communication systems. The estimators and detectors are often designed based on models of the system, which may be characterized by the channel covariance matrix, channel matrix, noise variance, etc. In practice, such modelling parameters may suffer from uncertainty due to the shortage of training samples, channel estimation errors, noise, etc., and standard model-based signal estimators may suffer from significant performance degradation. In this presentation, we report several regularization approaches to the design of channel and signal estimators for MIMO communications. We show that regularization methods based on shrinkage, banding, and rank reduction can improve the estimation of the channel covariance matrix and its inverse, which can be translated into noticeable performance improvements for the linear minimum mean squared error (LMMSE) estimators. We further show that regularization can be used to construct filter-based detectors for MIMO signal detection, producing low-complexity detectors with near-maximum likelihood (ML) performance. The critical issue of parameter selection is also discussed.
Speaker's Biography: Jun Tong received the Ph.D. degree in electronic engineering from City University of Hong Kong in 2009. Currently, he is a Senior Lecturer with the School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunications Engineering, University of Wollongong, Australia. Jun was a Research Associate at City University of Hong Kong from April 2004 until August 2005, a Research Academic at the University of Newcastle, Australia, from June 2009 until March 2011, and an Akademischer Rat with the University of Paderborn, Germany, from April 2011 until June 2013. His research interests are in statistical signal processing and communication systems.

Talk 8 - A Novel Receiver Design with Joint Coherent and Non-Coherent Processing

Dr. Wanchun Liu
The University of Sydney
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Abstract: We propose a novel splitting receiver, which involves a joint processing of coherently and non-coherently received signals. Using a passive RF power splitter, the received signal at each receiver antenna is split into two streams, which are then processed by a conventional coherent detection (CD) circuit and a power-detection (PD) circuit, respectively. The streams of the signals from all the receiver antennas are then jointly used for information detection. We show that the splitting receiver creates a 3-D received signal space due to the joint coherent and non-coherent processing. We analyze the achievable rate of a splitting receiver, which shows that the splitting receiver provides a rate gain of 3/2 compared with either the conventional (CD-based) coherent receiver or the PD-based non-coherent receiver in the high SNR regime. We also analyze the symbol error rate (SER) for practical modulation schemes, which shows that the splitting receiver achieves asymptotic SER reduction by a factor of at least √M-1 for M-QAM compared with either the conventional (CD-based) coherent receiver or the PD-based non-coherent receiver.
Speaker's Biography: Wanchun Liu is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Sydney. She received her PhD degree from the Australian National University in 2017. Before that she received the BE and ME degree from Beihang University. She has served as a TPC member for IEEE GLOBECOM, ICC, and VTC conferences. Her research interests include communication theory, wireless feedback control, backscatter communication, and wireless energy harvesting and transfer.

Session 3: Computing for Network

Talk 9 - Fog Computing: Closing the Gap Between Cloud and Data at the Network Edge

Dr. Hazer Inaltekin
The University of Melbourne
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Abstract: Fog computing is a new wave in the digital revolution of our society. A top venture capital fund Andreessen Horowitz recently called fog computing the next multi-billion dollar tech market, while Microsoft CEO referred to it as the most interesting part of cloud computing. The main promise of fog computing is its potential to enable more agile IoT systems by distributing communication, control, computation, data analytics and storage functionalities over the continuum from network edge to the cloud. With increasing dependence of Australia’s critical market segments such as manufacturing, resources, energy, health and transportation on smarter cyber-physical systems, fog computing has critical roles to play in fostering Australia’s future prosperity. In this talk, I will first explain the main motives leading to the paradigm of fog computing. Then, I will illustrate the fog computing architecture through practical use-cases as well as describing the current landscape of research and development activities in industry and academia.
Speaker's Biography: Hazer Inaltekin, PhD in electrical and computer engineering from Cornell University, is currently a senior research fellow in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Prior to joining the University of Melbourne, he held various researcher and lecturer positions in Australia, Europe and United States. He is a member of OpenFog Consortium, which is a public-private initiative founded by ARM, Cisco, Dell, Intel, Microsoft and Princeton University to promote an open reference architecture for fog computing. His current research interests include fog computing, IoT technology, wireless communications and information theory.

Talk 10 - Collaborative and Deep Learning-based Resource Allocation in Big Data Mobile Edge Computing

Dr. Nguyen H. Tran
Kyung Hee University, South Korea
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Abstract: Multi-access Edge Computing (MEC) has been introduced to supplement cloud computing by pushing computing, caching, communication, and control (4C) to the network edge. However, compared with remote cloud, MEC server resources are limited when operating independently; thus it cannot significantly reduce data exchange between users’ devices and remote clouds, let alone dealing with Big-Data applications at MEC. Therefore, a joint 4C at the edge with MEC server collaboration is especially critical for the coming era of Big-Data, which, however, is under-explored. In order to address these challenges, we formulate joint 4C in Big-Data MEC as an optimization problem that aims at maximizing bandwidth saving while minimizing computation delay cost, subject to the local computation capabilities of user devices, computation deadline, and MEC resource constraints. We apply block successive upper bound minimization (BSUM) method, where variables are grouped into independent blocks for being implemented in a distributed way, to solve this problem. Furthermore, it is very challenging to correctly predict future popularity of contents and decide which contents to store. We use deep learning where the training phase is executed at the cloud datacenters that can handle huge amount of raw data. Then, the trained model is transferred to the base station to distributively predict the content’s popularity and make cache decision. Thus, there is a trade-off between training cost at the cloud data center and caching gain at the base station. In this paper, we investigate this trade-off and propose a learning based caching scheme. This involves two distinct parts. i) Predicting the future popularity score of contents using Long Short-Term Memory, a celebrated technique of deep recurrent neural networks dedicated to time series data such as requested contents at base station. And ii) maximizing the profit by caching popular contents at base station based on the proposed prediction model. Then, we implement and train the prediction model using Tensorflow libraries, and test the performance of caching scheme with a python based simulator. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme outperforms existing algorithms in many key performance indicators, especially, in content hit probability and access delay.
Speaker's Biography: Nguyen H. Tran received the BS degree from Hochiminh City University of Technology and Ph.D degree from Kyung Hee University, in electrical and computer engineering, in 2005 and 2011, respectively. Since 2012, he has been an Assistant Professor with Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Kyung Hee University. His research interest is applying analytic techniques of optimization, game theory, and machine learning to cutting-edge applications such as cloud and mobile-edge computing, datacenters, resource allocation for 5G networks, and Internet of Things. He received the best KHU thesis award in engineering in 2011 and several best paper awards, including IEEE ICC 2016, APNOMS 2016, and IEEE ICCS 2016. He receives the Korea NRF Funding for Basic Science and Research from 2016 to 2023. He has been the Editor of IEEE Transactions on Green Communications and Networking since 2016, and served as the Editor of the 2017 Newsletter of Technical Committee on Cognitive Networks on Internet of Things.

Session 4: IoT and Networking

Talk 11 - On the Energy-Delay Tradeoff in Streaming Data

Prof. Zixiang Xiong
Texas A&M University
Monash University
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Abstract: We study basic tradeoffs between energy and delay in wireless communication systems using finite blocklength theory. We first assume that data arrive in constant stream of bits, which are put into packets and transmitted over a communications link. We show that depending on exactly how energy is measured, in general energy depends on \sqrt(d^{-1}) or \sqrt(d^{-1}*logd), where d is the delay. This means that the energy decreases quite slowly with increasing delay. Furthermore, to approach the absolute minimum of -1.59 dB on energy, bandwidth has to increase very rapidly, much more than what is predicted by infinite blocklength theory. We then consider the scenario when data arrive stochastically in packets and can be queued. We devise a scheduling algorithm based on finite blocklength theory and develop bounds for the energy-delay performance. Our results again show that the energy decreases quite slowly with increasing delay.
Speaker's Biography: Zixiang Xiong received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1996. He is a professor in the ECE department of Texas A&M University and Monash University. His main research interest lies in image/video processing, networked multimedia, and multi-user information theory.

Talk 12 - Distributed Stochastic Optimization of Network Function Virtualization

Prof. Iain Collings
Macquarie University
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Abstract: Decoupling network services from underlying hardware, network function virtualization (NFV) is expected to significantly improve agility and reduce network cost. However, network services, sequences of network functions, need to be processed in specific orders at specific types of virtual machines (VMs), which couples decisions of VMs on processing or routing network services. Built on a new stochastic dual gradient method, we have developed an approach that suppresses the couplings, minimizes the time-average cost of NFV, stabilizes queues at VMs, and reduces the backlogs of unprocessed services through online learning and adaptation. Asymptotically optimal decisions are instantly generated at individual VMs. Numerical results show that the proposed method is able to reduce the time-average cost of NFV by 30% and reduce the queue length (or delay) by 83%, as compared to existing non-stochastic approaches.
Speaker's Biography: Iain Collings is the Deputy Dean of the School of Engineering at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. From 2005-2014 he worked at the CSIRO, Australia, where he held a number of roles including Deputy Chief of Division, Research Program Leader, and Theme Leader. From 1999-2005 he was a Senior Lecturer and then Associate Professor in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering at the University of Sydney. Prior to that he spent 3 years as a Lecturer at the University of Melbourne. He has published over 300 research papers in the area of wireless communications. He served as an Editor for IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications and a Guest Editor for the EURASIP Journal on Advanced Signal Processing, as well as Chairing numerous Technical Program Committees of major international conferences. He has served as the Chair of the IEEE NSW Section Joint Communications & Signal Processing Chapter (2008-2010), and Secretary of the IEEE NSW Section (2010). He was awarded the Engineers Australia IREE Neville Thiele Award 2009 for outstanding achievements in engineering, and the IEEE CommSoc Stephen O. Rice Award in 2011.

Talk 13 - Drone-based Communication and Wireless Signal Detection (or why a drone may one day save your life)

Dr. Graeme Woodward
University of Canterbury, New Zealand
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Abstract: Increasingly people are wearing or implanting biometric and medical sensors, e.g. a wrist-band, heart monitor, foot-mounted accelerometer and a smart phone could form a wireless Body Area Network (BAN). Collectively these measure vital signals to help infer the person’s physiological and psychological state. The future ubiquity of such wireless BANs creates an opportunity to improve response to wide-scale incidents such as earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, or building collapse where search, rescue and paramedic assistance are imperatives. Both New Zealand and Japan have suffered wide-scale disasters: the 2010/11 Christchurch earthquakes and the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake with ensuing tsunami and power station accident. The Royal Society of NZ and the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science have funded a joint research programme between the University of Canterbury and Yokohama National University. We describe a network of co-operating unmanned aerial vehicles tasked with identifying the locations and health state of casualties using a combination of methods, including detection of radio signatures associated with each person from their wireless BANs. The University of Canterbury team has focussed on discovery of wireless devices. The team has compared numerous detection strategies, including energy detection, matched filtering and spectral correlation density (SCD) analysis, exploiting the cyclostationary structure man-made wireless signals.
Speaker's Biography: Graeme Woodward (SM’11) received the B.Sc, B.E., and Ph.D. degrees from The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia, in 1990, 1992, and 1999, respectively. He joined the University of Canterbury (UC), Christchurch, New Zealand, as a Research Leader of the Wireless Research Centre in January 2011. Prior to joining UC, he was a Research Manager with the Telecommunications Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe, working closely with the University of Bristol and participating in numerous collaborative projects within the U.K. and European research communities. He has extensive industrial research experience covering mobile phone standards. He joined Bell Laboratories Research Sydney (Lucent Technologies) in 2001 to research third-generation systems, multiuser detection, interference suppression, multiantenna systems, and adaptive digital filter algorithms for equalization. He was part of the team which pioneered Very Large Scale Integration designs for Multi-In/Multi-Out antenna reception of High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA). With the Bell Labs group transitioning to Agere Systems Australia and subsequently LSI Logic in 2003 and 2007, respectively, the focus moved to terminal-side algorithms for HSDPA and Long-Term Evolution with an increased emphasis on low power design. His earlier experience includes digital switching systems with Alcatel Australia and channel modelling and multiuser detection for code-division multiple access systems with SP Communications, in collaboration with The University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. He has authored 12 journal articles, more than 30 conference papers, and is an Inventor on 12 U.S. patents. Dr. Woodward has served on several conference committees, including as Technical Program Committee Chair for ITNAC16, VTC15-Spring, and AusCTW05 and 06; a Local Organising Chair for ISSSTA04, and a Conference Chair of the NZ Wireless Workshop in 2011. He is a member of the Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists, and Managers Australia.

Talk 14 - Massive Machine Type Communication with Data Aggregation and Resource Scheduling

Dr. Jing Guo
The Australian National University
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Abstract: To enable massive machine type communication (mMTC), data aggregation is a promising approach to reduce the congestion caused by a massive number of machine type devices (MTDs). In this talk, I present my recent work on the data aggregation for mMTC. We investigate a two-phase cellular-based mMTC network where MTDs transmit to aggregators (i.e., aggregation phase) and the aggregated data is then relayed to base stations (i.e., relaying phase). Due to the limited resources, the aggregators not only aggregate data, but also schedule resources among MTDs. Two scheduling schemes are considered: random resource scheduling and channel-aware resource scheduling. By leveraging the stochastic geometry, we present a tractable analytical framework to investigate the signal-to-interference ratio for each phase, thereby computing the MTD success probability and probability of successful channel utilization, which are the key metrics characterizing the overall mMTC performance. The results suggest that the provision of more resources at the aggregation phase is not always beneficial to the mMTC performance.
Speaker's Biography: Dr. Jing Guo is a research fellow at the Research School of Engineering, Australian National University, Australia. She received her B.E. degree from the Australian National University and the Beijing Institute of Technology in 2012, and PhD degree from the Australian National University in 2016. Her research interest lies in the field of wireless communications, including the machine type communication and the application of stochastic geometry in wireless networks.

Session 5: MIMO

Talk 15 - Opportunistic Spatial Modulation in MIMO Systems

Prof. Jamie Evans
The University of Melbourne
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Abstract: In this talk I will give an introduction to spatial modulation. We first look at the situation where no channel state information is available at the transmitter and then explore how things change when channel state information is available. I will then discuss a new spatial modulation technique coined opportunistic spatial modulation and present some analytical performance bounds along with a comparison to existing approaches.
Speaker's Biography: Jamie S. Evans (S’93–M’98) was born in Newcastle, Australia, in 1970. He received the B.S. degree in physics and the B.E. degree in computer engineering from the University of Newcastle, in 1992 and 1993, respectively, and the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Melbourne, Australia, in 1996 and 1998, respectively. From 1998 to 1999, he was a Visiting Researcher with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley. Since returning to Australia in 1999, he has held academic positions with the University of Sydney, University of Melbourne, and Monash University. He is currently a Professor and the Deputy Dean with the Melbourne School of Engineering, University of Melbourne. His research interests are in communications theory, information theory, and statistical signal processing with a focus on wireless communications networks. He received the University Medal from the University of Newcastle and the Chancellor’s Prize for excellence for his Ph.D. thesis.

Talk 16 - Analysis of Cell-Free Massive MIMO with Random Node Deployment Networks

Dr. Saman Atapattu
The University of Melbourne
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Abstract: Cell-free massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is a network comprising a large number of randomly-located single- or multiple-antenna access points where each user is served simultaneously by all of the access points. Since network MIMO or distributed MIMO can reduce inter-cell interference through coherent cooperation between base stations, cell-free Massive MIMO may be a better option for providing higher spectral efficiencies and coverage probabilities than using uncoordinated small-cells. Cell-free massive MIMO also exploits the similar properties of co-located massive MIMO when the number of antennas of access points is large to multiplex many users in the same time-frequency resource. However, fundamental performance limitations of cell-free massive MIMO have not been fully demonstrated so far for a realistic stochastic node deployment with single or small number of antenna access points. Thus, performance analysis of such system is the focus of this work.
Speaker's Biography: Saman Atapattu received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Alberta, Canada, in 2013. He is currently a Research Fellow with the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

Talk 17 - Distributed Transmit Beamforming in Mobile Environment: How to enable long range wireless data transmission utilising multiple of locally distributed low power transmitters

Dr. Hajime Suzuki
Data61, CSIRO
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Abstract: Distributed transmit beamforming (DTB) with N transmitters ideally achieves the improvement in receiver signal to noise ratio (SNR) by the factor of N^2. For example, 10 transmitters each transmitting 10 mW may achieve the receiver SNR equivalent to that of a 1 W transmitter. Such a gain can be translated into the extension of the wireless link distance and/or increase in the data rate. To enable DTB, each transmitter needs to know its channel carrier phase and to adjust its transmission so that the carrier phases from the multiple transmitters are all aligned and the waveform coherently combined at the receiver. This is particularly challenging in multipath mobile environment since the channel changes rapidly as the transmitter and/or receiver move. In this presentation, we show analytical as well as simulation results comparing DTB schemes utilising channel reciprocity and channel feedback. Effects of channel estimation error using multi-transmitter channel estimation methods based on time division multiple access and code division multiple access are analysed. Performance degradation due to analog channel feedback error and the effectiveness of the channel prediction method based on adaptive filter are shown.
Speaker's Biography: Hajime Suzuki received B.E. and M.E. degrees from the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, Japan in 1993 and 1995, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia, in 1999. Since 1999, Hajime engages in research activities at the Marsfield Radiophysics Laboratory of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). He is an active participant of the Australian Radio Communication Study Group 3 and of the Study Group 3 (Radio Propagation) of the International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R). His research interests include radio propagation, multi-antenna technologies, and software defined radio.

Talk 18 - Millimetre Waves, The 5G Frontier

Prof. Mike Faulkner
Victoria University
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Abstract: With the introduction of the fourth generation (4G) of wireless equipment almost complete, the focus of the research community has switched to the fifth generation (5G), targeted for commercialization in 2019. Increased data rates, a renewed focus on the internet-of-things and the scarcity of spectrum will force operators into higher frequency bands despite deteriorating performance in terms of coverage. The new mm-wave bands under consideration offer both the opportunity for wider bandwidths and the challenge of providing the coverage. The presentation will briefly introduce 5G, and then discuss some issues that apply to mm-waves. The Telstra sponsored mm-wave measurement program currently underway at Victoria University will then be described.
Speaker's Biography: Professor Michael Faulkner received a B.Sc.(Eng) from University of London, UK, and a Ph.D. (1993) from the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is professor in Telecommunications at Victoria University, Australia. His original research interest was in the application of (digital) signal processing techniques to the correction of the non-ideal characteristics of practical RF components; for example, quadrature modulators and power amplifiers. Since then his interests have broadened to encompass all physical layer aspects of wireless systems, with an emphasis on implementation. He has supervised projects in radio propagation measurements (wideband channel sounding, direction of arrival etc.), MIMO, transceiver algorithms, architectures and circuits, physical layer signal processing, and modulation. His current activities are focused on fifth generation wireless technologies.

Best Thesis Prize

This session will have presentations by the following shortlisted candidates for the Australian and New Zealand Communications Theory Best Thesis Prize:

  • Dr. Behzad Asadi, The University of Newcastle
  • Dr. Ni Ding, The Australian National University
  • Dr. Hassan Habibi Gharakheili, University of New South Wales
  • Dr. Yeqing Hu, Monash University
  • Dr. Wanchun Liu, The Australian National University

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Posters

Poster Session 1

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1 - On Channel Reciprocity to Activate Uplink Channel Training for Downlink Data Transmission

Chunhui LiShihao YanNan Yang
The Australian National University
Abstract: We determine, for the first time, the requirement on channel reciprocity to activate uplink channel training, instead of downlink channel training, to achieve a higher data rate for the downlink transmission from a multi-antenna base station to a single-antenna user. To this end, we first derive novel closed-form expressions for the lower bounds on the data rates achieved by these two channel training strategies by considering the impact of finite blocklength. The performance comparison result of these two strategies is determined by the amount of channel reciprocity that is utilized in the uplink channel training. We then derive an approximated but analytical expression for the minimum channel reciprocity that enables the uplink channel training to outperform the downlink channel training. Through numerical results, we demonstrate that this minimum channel reciprocity decreases as the blocklength decreases or the number of transmit antennas increases, which shows the necessity and benefits of activating the uplink channel training for short-packet communications with massive transmit antennas. This work provides pivotal and unprecedented guidelines on choosing channel training strategies and channel reciprocity calibrations in practice.
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2 - Computational Complexity Reduction Techniques for Composite Coding

Yucheng Liu1Parastoo Sadeghi1Fatemeh Arbabjolfaei2Young-Han Kim2
1The Australian National University
2University of California, San Diego, USA
Abstract: Index coding studies the optimal broadcast rate of multiple messages from a server to multiple receivers with side information. In the poster, computational complexity reduction techniques are presented for composite coding, which is an existing layered random coding scheme for the index coding problem. As the problem size grows, the number of composite indices grows exponentially and the number of possible decoding configurations (decoding sets) grows super exponentially, leading to considerable complexity for computing the rate region achieved by the composite coding scheme. The proposed techniques address both issues while do not affect the performance (tightness) of the coding scheme. Removing composite indices is achieved by checking whether one’s rate can be transferred without loss to the other in the expressions of the achievable rate region. Decoding configurations are reduced by establishing a baseline or natural decoding configuration, where no smaller decoding configuration can provide a strictly larger rate region. Numerical results demonstrate good performance with substantial reduction in complexity. To achieve the capacity region for all 9608 non-isomorphic five-message index coding problems, a single natural decoding configuration is sufficient. And more than 22 out of 2^5-1 = 31 composite indices are removed, on average.
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3 - Building Entry Loss and Elevation Angle at Millimeter waves

Saurav DahalShabbir AhmedMike FaulknerHorace King
Victoria University
Abstract: The frequency scarcity in sub-GHz band will force the telecom operators to operate in the millimeter spectrum bands for the fifth generation of mobile systems (5G). This includes the millimeter wave bands, operating above 24 GHz. Millimeter waves enable an order of magnitude increase in bandwidth greater than 1 GHz, but are subject to higher attenuation due to number of factors such as rain, atmospheric effects and building penetration. High Altitude Platforms (HAPS) want good indoor coverage whereas satellites don’t want good indoor coverage due to potential interference issues between mobile terminals and the satellite uplink channels. Building Entry Loss (BEL) is the parameter which determines the additional loss beyond that expected from the free space loss prediction. Measurements have been reported for determining BEL [1] below 6 GHz [2-5]. More measurements regarding BEL are needed in the mm-wave bands for proper deployment of IMT-2020 mm-wave signals. In this poster, we are focusing on the building penetration loss experienced by mm-waves and present the results of a measurement campaign on slant-path building-entry loss undertaken in Melbourne Australia. The objective of this campaign was to determine the additive losses due to the building structure and materials as experienced by IMT-2020 signals in the K/Ka bands around 24 GHz. References:[1] ITU-R Rec. P.1411-3, 2005. [2] F. Pérez-Fontán, et al “Building entry loss and delay spread,” EURASIP JWCN, vol. 2008, no. 1, pp. 427352, 2008. [3] T. Jost, et al, “A satellite-to-Indoor entry loss model,” IEEE TAP , vol. 61, no. 4,
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4 - Mobility Management Optimization in Millimeter Wave Heterogeneous Networks

Shizhe ZangWei BaoPhee Lep YeohHe ChenZihuai LinBranka VuceticYonghui Li
Center of Excellence Communication, School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney
Abstract: In this paper, we develop a new mobility-aware handover algorithm for users in microwave and millimeter wave (mmWave) heterogeneous networks. The proposed handover algorithm applies a Markov decision process (MDP) and a Gauss-Markov mobility model to optimize handovers based on user velocity, location, SNR and estimated time spent in the mmWave small cell (known as the small cell dwell time). Practical mmWave beam alignment overheads and blockage effects are also taken into account in the MDP formulation and optimization. Simulation results verify that the proposed MDP-based handover algorithm achieves significantly higher data rates compared with traditional SNR-based handovers for low to high velocity users.
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5 - On the Performance of Non-Orthogonal Multiple Access in Short-Packet Communications

Yuehua YuHe ChenYonghui LiZhiguo DingBranka Vucetic
The University of Sydney
Abstract: This work investigates the performance of nonorthogonal multiple access (NOMA) in short-packet communications. Specifically, we aim to answer a fundamental question – for given reliability requirements of users, how much physical-layer transmission latency can NOMA reduce when compared to its orthogonal multiple access counterparts in the finite blocklength regime? To this end, we derive closed-form expressions for the block error rates of users in NOMA. Based on this, we further obtain the near-optimal power allocation coefficients and blocklength to ensure certain reliability. Numerical results validate our theoretical analysis and demonstrate the superior performance of NOMA in reducing transmission latency.
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6 - Error Bounds for Uplink and Downlink 3D Localization in 5G mmWave Systems

Zohair Abu-Shaban1 2Xiangyun Zhou1Thushara Abhayapala1Gonzalo Seco-Granados3Henk Wymeersch4
1The Australian National University
2University of New South Wales, Canberra
3Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
4Chalmers University of Technology
Abstract: Location-aware communication systems are expected to play a pivotal part in the next generation of mobile communication networks. Therefore, there is a need to understand the localization limits in these networks, particularly, using millimeter-wave technology (mmWave). Towards that, we address the uplink and downlink localization limits in terms of 3D position and orientation error bounds for mmWave multipath channels. We also carry out a detailed analysis of the dependence of the bounds of different systems parameters. Our key findings indicate that the uplink and downlink behave differently in two distinct ways. First of all, the error bounds have different scaling factors with respect to the number of antennas in the uplink and downlink. Secondly, uplink localization is sensitive to the orientation angle of the user equipment (UE), whereas downlink is not. Moreover, in the considered outdoor scenarios, the non-line-of-sight paths generally improve localization when a line-of-sight path exists. Finally, our numerical results show that mmWave systems are capable of localizing a UE with sub-meter position error, and sub-degree orientation error.
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7 - Evaluation of Joint MMSE Precoding in 3GPP based CoMP System

Arun GurungDuong Pham
NEC Australia
Abstract: In this poster, we present some link-level simulation results for Joint MMSE (jMMSE) precoding method applied to a 3GPP LTE-based CoMP (Coordinated Multi-Point) system. Different types of CoMP such as Dynamic Point Selection (DPS) and Joint Transmission (JT) are compared in terms of performance. CoMP has been one of the key enabling techniques for cellular mobile system to improve the system reliability and capacity. In order to implement CoMP in a practical system such as 3GPP systems, we need to consider practical considerations such as limited feedback, precoding methods, implementation complexity, etc. We investigated the performance of jMMSE precoding in a 3GPP CoMP system. For a given transmit power constraint, jMMSE method provides a set of optimal precoders and decoders in terms of mean squared error. A 3GPP specifications compliant link-level simulator and a typical set of system parameters were used for the evaluations. Based on the results, jMMSE method shows improvement of the JT CoMP performance.
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8 - Constellation Optimization for Nonlinear Satellite Channels

Azam MehboobKelvin LaytonWilliam CowleyGottfried Lechner
Institute for Telecommunications Research, University of South Australia
Abstract: The increasing demand for high-quality imagery from earth observation satellites (EOS) requires spectrally efficient modulations such as Amplitude Phase Shift Keying (APSK) for satellite downlinks. These modulations are well suited to the satellite channel where the power amplifier (PA), when driven closer to saturation for maximum efficiency, produces nonlinear (NL) signal distortions. This PA nonlinearity and the pulse shaping filter memory cause warping and clustering of the signal constellation, resulting in a severe performance degradation. In order to deal with this distortion, APSK constellation parameters are optimized for the NL channel before transmission. In current methods, this optimization is done in two steps. An APSK constellation is first optimized for the linear channel and then precompensated at the transmitter for the NL channel distortion. In this work, we have proposed a one-step method to directly optimize APSK constellation parameters for the NL satellite channel. Our method minimizes the symbol error rate (SER) at the receiver by taking into account the NL distortion. SER simulations have been performed with an accurate model of a traveling-wave tube PA, obtained from real EOS data, showing 0.5 dB signal to noise ratio (SNR) gain for our method. We have also validated these simulation results by hardware-in-the-loop tests, using a custom built testbed with a solid state PA in the lab.
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9 - An Iterative Soft-Decision Decoding Algorithm with Dynamic Saturation for Short Reed-Solomon Codes

Bryan LiuYixuan XieLei YangJinhong Yuan
University of New South Wales
Abstract: This paper proposes a new iterative soft-decision decoding algorithm which combines dynamic saturation list decoding and adaptive belief propagation (ABP) algorithm for short Reed-Solomon (RS) codes. In the proposed algorithm, a relatively large damping coefficient which is proportional to the channel noise variance is used in the ABP decoder to achieve a fast convergence speed. To compensate the degraded error rate performance which might be caused by a fast convergence speed at a high signal-to-noise ratios regime, a list of codewords is obtained by restarting the decoder with log-likelihood ratios saturations to the dynamically selected suspicious bits based on an up-to-date best decoded codeword. The performance of the proposed algorithm for several short RS codes is investigated. It shows that the proposed algorithm brings a considerable coding gain for short RS codes over additive white Gaussian noise channels.
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10 - Bandwidth Versus I/O Cost in Repairing Reed-Solomon Codes

Hoang Dau
Monash University
Abstract: We present our recent research on the trade-off between the repair bandwidth and the (read) I/O cost of repair schemes for some families of Reed-Solomon codes. We show that for such families, optimal bandwidth requires I/O cost as high as that of a naive repair scheme.
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11 - Optimal Non-Coherent Joint Transmission and Power Allocation Policies for Coordinated Multipoint OFDM Systems

Bing Luo1Phee Lep Yeoh2Brian Krongold1
1Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne
2School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney
Abstract: This paper considers an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) coordinated multipoint (CoMP) transmission system in which K coordinated transmission points (CTPs) non-coherently transmit and allocate power over N subchannels. To maximize the system capacity, we derive a new optimal closed-form power allocation solutions by analyzing the Complementary Slackness in Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions of the objective. Our theoretical derivations show that the optimization problem is equivalent to solving a subchannel association problem, and it turns out that the closed-form solutions take the form of classical waterfilling but with a distinguished coordinated feature. Interestingly, different from waterfilling, the CTPs do not always transmit on their best subchannels. Numerical results are presented to verify our theoretical findings.
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12 - On the Symbol Error Probability for QPSK with Quantized Observations

Samiru GayanRajitha SenanayakeJamie Evans
The University of Melbourne
Abstract: We consider a single-input-single-output (SISO) system with quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation and derive an easy-to-evaluate expression for the symbol error probability (SEP) when a general n-bit phase quantization is used at the receiver. We further evaluate the expressions asymptotically to characterize the diversity order and the quantization penalty at high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). We observe that the system with n-bit phase quantization achieves full diversity order of one when n > 2. Numerical examples are used to verify the analysis.
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13 - Trajectory Optimization for Completion Time Minimization in UAV-Enabled Relaying

Ruide LiDerrick Wing Kwan NgLei YangJinhong Yuan
The University of New South Wales
Abstract: Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) has been applied to many fields due to its high flexibility and low cost in deployment. In particular, system designers can adjust the locations of UAVs dynamically. With the development of different aircrafts, there also comes with some specific regulations of the No-Fly-Zone (NFZ) while there is a great communication demand in NFZ. In this paper, we study the mission completion time minimization problem in rotary wing UAV-assist mobile relaying systems which takes into account the UAV’s receive and transmit rate along with the UAV’s practical mobility constraints (initial/final relay locations, and the NFZ). In contrast to the existing literature on UAV’s relaying to fixed nodes, we have also considered the uncertainty of destination nodes’ locations and the NFZ.
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14 - Resource Allocation in SWIPT Relay Networks with Circuit Power Consumption

Bhathiya PilanawithanaSaman AtapattuJamie Evans
The University of Melbourne
Abstract: This paper considers simultaneous wireless information and power transfer (SWIPT) over a dual-hop decode-and-forward (DF) relay network with the power-splitting (PS) energy harvesting protocol at the relay. The circuit power consumption (CPC), which includes power requirements for both decoding and encoding circuits, is considered at the relay. The optimal throughput, PS ratio and relay transmit power are analytically derived for a rate-dependent linear CPC model.
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15 - Opportunistic Wireless Energy Transfer in Point-to-Point Networks

Amanthi ThudugalageSaman AtapattuJamie Evans
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne
Abstract: This research considers a point-to-point single-input single-output (SISO) network with an energy transmitter and an energy harvesting (EH) user which has a constraint on EH time. We study an opportunistic energy transfer scheme for a block-faded frame structure. In particular, the amount of energy to be transmitted at each frame is determined in order to maximize the expected total harvested energy when only the past and present channels are known. We investigate this problem for two scenarios: i) without channel estimation energy; and ii) with channel estimation energy. We completely solve the optimization problem, and find the optimum threshold of each frame and the maximum expected total harvested energy of the network.
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16 - Optimal Detection Interval for Absorbing Receivers in Molecular Communication Systems with Interference

Trang Ngoc Cao1Nikola Zlatanov2Phee Lep Yeoh3Jamie Evans1
1Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne
2Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering, Monash University
3School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney
Abstract: We consider a molecular communication system comprised of a transmitter, an absorbing receiver, and an interference source. Assuming amplitude modulation, we analyze the dependence of the bit error rate (BER) on the duration of the detection interval, which is the time within one transmission symbol interval during which the receiver is active to absorb and count molecules. We then propose algorithms to obtain the optimal detection interval that minimizes the BER of the considered molecular communication system. Simulation and numerical evaluations are provided to highlight further insights into the optimal results. For example, we demonstrate that the optimal detection interval can be very small compared to the transmission symbol interval. Moreover, our numerical results show that significant BER improvements are achieved using the optimal detection interval.
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17 - An A Priori Algorithm for Simulating Absorbing Receivers in Diffusion-Based Molecular Communications

Yiran Wang1Adam Noel2Nan Yang1
1Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
2School of Information Technology and Engineering, University of Ottawa, Canada
Abstract: The simulation of diffusion-based molecular communication (MC) systems with absorbing receivers often requires a high computational complexity to produce accurate results. Recently, a study proposed a new approach to improve the efficiency of conventional algorithms, referred to as the refined Monte Carlo (RMC) method. However, for the simulation with relatively small diffusion step lengths, the improvement brought by this method becomes less significant. In this work, we propose a new algorithm, i.e., the a priori Monte Carlo (APMC) method, to simulate diffusion in the presence of a spherical absorbing receiver with relatively large diffusion step lengths. This algorithm matches the expected analytical fraction of absorbed molecules better than the existing simulation algorithms when the diffusion step length is sufficiently large. For the RMC and the APMC, we explore the trade-offs between simulation accuracy and computational complexity, based on which we propose a rejection threshold for the absorption probability to save computation time. Our work serves as an effective way to reduce the computational complexity of simulation for diffusion-based MC systems with an absorbing receiver.
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18 - Using Spatial Partitioning to Reduce Receiver Noise in Molecular Communication

Muhammad Usman RiazChun Tung Chou
University of New South Wales
Abstract: Molecular communication is a bio-inspired approach to communication using the transmission and reception of molecules. An issue that affects the receiver performance is the amount of noise in the receiver. Earlier work in molecular communication has characterized the noise in molecular receiver under a number of different scenarios. A scenario that has not been considered is the impact of spatially partitioning of receiver on the noise of the receiver. This poster will present results on using spatial partitioning to reduce noise in the receiver.
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Poster Session 2

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1 - Training Beam Sequence Optimization for Millimeter Wave MIMO Tracking Systems

Deyou ZhangHe ChenMahyar ShirvanimoghaddamYonghui LiBranka Vucetic
School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney
Abstract: In this paper, we consider the design of training beam sequence for sparse millimeter wave (mmWave) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) tracking systems. We use Markov random walks to model the temporal variations of the beam steering angle of arrival (AoA) and angle of departure (AoD), respectively. By exploiting the MIMO virtual channel representation, the AoA/AoD tracking problem is equivalent to choosing a set of directional training beams to find the nonzero elements in a two-dimensional virtual channel matrix. Furthermore, in contrast to existing work that used each transmitting-receiving beam pair once only, we consider a more general case such that each beam pair might be adopted more than once in the tracking procedure. As the number of repetitions of each transmitting-receiving beam pair can only be integer, the training beam sequence design problem is then formulated as an integer nonlinear programming (INLP) problem. To resolve the formulated INLP problem, we derive a tractable lower bound of the successful tracking probability and then decompose it into a set of convex INLP subproblems, which are solved by implementing an iterative branch-and-bound (BB) method. Numerical results show that our proposed iterative BB algorithm significantly outperforms the benchmark schemes and achieves near-optimal tracking performance.
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2 - Ultra-Reliable Short-Packet Communications: Half-Duplex or Full-Duplex Relaying?

Yifan GuHe ChenYonghui LiBranka Vucetic
School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney
Abstract: This poster analyzes and compares the performance of full-duplex relaying (FDR) and half-duplex relaying (HDR) for ultra-reliable short-packet communications. Specifically, we derive both approximate and asymptotic closed-form expressions of the block error rate (BLER) for FDR and HDR using short packets with finite blocklength codes. We define and attain a closed-form expression of a critical BLER, which can be used to efficiently determine the optimal duplex mode for ultra-reliable low latency communication scenarios. Our results unveil that FDR is more appealing to the system with relatively lower transmit power constraint, less stringent BLER requirement and stronger loop interference suppression.This letter analyzes and compares the performance of full-duplex relaying (FDR) and half-duplex relaying (HDR) for ultra-reliable short-packet communications. Specifically, we derive both approximate and asymptotic closed-form expressions of the block error rate (BLER) for FDR and HDR using short packets with finite blocklength codes. We define and attain a closed-form expression of a critical BLER, which can be used to efficiently determine the optimal duplex mode for ultra-reliable low latency communication scenarios. Our results unveil that FDR is more appealing to the system with relatively lower transmit power constraint, less stringent BLER requirement and stronger loop interference suppression.
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3 - Optimal Load Balancing in Millimeter Wave Cellular Heterogeneous Networks

Simin XuNan YangShihao Yan
Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University
Abstract: In this poster, we propose a novel and effective approach to optimizing the load balancing in a millimeter wave (mmWave) cellular heterogeneous network (HetNet) with a macro-tier and a micro-tier. The unique characteristics of mmWave transmission are incorporated into the network by adopting the Poisson point process (PPP) for base station (BS) location, the line-of-sight (LoS) ball model for mmWave links, the sectored antenna model for key antenna array characteristics, and Nakagami-m fading for wireless channels. To reduce the load of macro-tier BSs, we consider a bias factor W in the network for offloading user equipments (UEs) to micro-tier BSs. For this network, we first analyze the loads of macro- and micro-tier BSs. Then we derive a new expression for the rate coverage probability of the network, based on which the optimal W maximizing the rate coverage probability is found. Through numerical results, we demonstrate the correctness of our analysis and the validity of the optimal W. Importantly, the optimal W can bring a profound improvement in the rate coverage probability relative to a fixed W. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of various network parameters, e.g., the densities and the beamwidths of BSs, on the rate coverage probability and the optimal W, offering valuable guidelines into practical mmWave HetNet design.
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4 - A Novel And Tractable Antenna Selection in Spatial Modulation Systems

Yuanyuan He1Saman Atapattu1Jamie S. Evans1Chintha Tellambura2
1The University of Melbourne
2University of Alberta, Canada
Abstract: A novel opportunistic antenna selection aided spatial modulation, called opportunistic spatial modulation (OSM), is proposed, which exhibits an attractive system reliability enhancement with low complexity. Its unique features enable a comprehensive analytical framework, which is challenging to acquire with existing transmit-antenna-selection-aided spatial modulation (TASS-SM) schemes. Closed-form expression of improved union bound of the average symbol error probability (ASEP) of proposed OSM-MISO system is derived. Furthermore, we compare the proposed OSM with two existing TASS-SM schemes to confirm the feasibility and effectiveness of our scheme. Simulation results are provided to corroborate the analytical results.
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5 - Downlink Power Control in Massive MIMO Networks with Distributed Antenna Arrays

Noman Akbar1Emil Bjornson2Erik G. Larsson2Nan Yang1
1Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University
2Department of Electrical Engineering (ISY), Linkoping University, Sweden
Abstract: In this poster, we investigate downlink power control in massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) networks with distributed antenna arrays. The base station (BS) in each cell consists of multiple antenna arrays, which are deployed in arbitrary locations within the cell. Due to the spatial separation between antenna arrays, the large-scale propagation effect is different from a user to different antenna arrays in a cell, which makes power control a challenging problem as compared to conventional massive MIMO. We assume that the BS in each cell obtains the channel estimates via the uplink training. Based on the channel estimates, the BSs perform maximum ratio transmission for the downlink. We then derive a closed-form spectral efficiency (SE) expression, where the channels are subject to correlated fading. Utilizing the derived expression, we propose a max-min power control algorithm to ensure that each user in the network receives a uniform quality of service. Numerical results demonstrate that, for the network considered in this work, optimizing for max-min SE through the max-min power control improves the sum SE of the network by 33% as compared to the equal power allocation.
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6 - Full-Duplex Joint Backhaul-Access Resource Allocation for Two-Tier Heterogeneous Networks

Xiangyue Meng1Phee Lep Yeoh2Brian Krongold1
1Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne
2School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney
Abstract: In this work, we propose a full-duplex (FD) joint backhaul-access resource allocation algorithm of downlink power and subchannels between a macrocell base station (MBS) and a small cell base station (SBS) in two-tier heterogeneous networks (HetNets) to promote frequency reuse and to boost the throughput of the networks to the next level.. Considering fairness among multiple users served by the SBS, we propose a two-stage optimization algorithm to maximize the minimum user rate. Specifically, we develop a matching theory framework to allocate subchannels in the first stage. Based on this, we apply successive convex approximation (SCA) to solve the non-convex power allocation in the second stage. Numerical simulations show that our proposed FD backhaul-access allocation scheme outperforms traditional half-duplex (HD) schemes, such as frequency-division duplex (FDD) and time-division duplex (TDD), by approximately a factor of 1.5. We also highlight that our algorithm converges to a solution that is close to the exhaustive search result with minimal computational complexity.
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7 - On Offloading Fog Radio Access Networks Fronthaul using Device Caching and Cooperation

Kameliya Kaneva1Neda Aboutorab1Sameh Sorour2Mark C. Reed1
1University of New South Wales
2University of Idaho, USA
Abstract: We consider the device-based Fog Radio Access Networks (F-RANs) where the smart user devices (denoted by F-UEs) can cache files and communicate with each other to retrieve their missing files. By letting the F-UEs cooperatively send information, this architecture naturally decreases the load on the fronthaul of the central processing unit (BBU) and increases the capacity of the network. However, we aim to maximize the offloading of the fronthaul by utilizing network coded (NC) transmissions. Realistically, the F-UE devices are half-duplex and can either send or receive in a given time slot. To ensure high quality of experience (QoE), the condition of all F-UE devices receiving their requests in maximum two time slots is imposed on the system. First, the problem is formulated over an NC graph. Given that it is a NP-hard problem, we propose two heuristic algorithms to solve the problem in real-time. The upper bound and the complexity of the heuristics are found. Moreover, their asymptotic optimality is proven. Simulation results show that these proposed algorithms perform closely to the optimal solution. The significant reduction of spared channels from the BBU achieved by our proposed heuristics is graphically demonstrated.
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8 - Capacity Analysis and Design Aspects of Delayed Bit Interleaved Coded Modulation

Kechao Huang1Ingmar Land2W. K. Leung1
1All Optics Lab, 2012 Labs, Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.
2Mathematical and Algorithmic Sciences Lab, France Research Center, Huawei Technologies France SASU
Abstract: Delayed bit interleaved coded modulation (DBICM) generalizes BICM by mapping different delayed codewords onto the same signal point. In this poster, we developed tools to determine the capacity of DBICM for any delay scheme and any labeling of any constellation. Based on these tools, we derived labeling rules so that DBICM can approach capacity for constellations that do not support Gray labeling. For these constellations, DBICM becomes an attractive generalization of BICM as it preserves the main advantage of the latter, namely the usage of a single channel code.
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9 - Reliability-Based Windowed Decoding for Spatially-Coupled LDPC Codes

Peng KangYixuan XieLei YangJinhong Yuan
The University of New South Wales
Abstract: In this poster, we propose a reliability-based windowed decoding scheme for spatially-coupled (SC) low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. To mitigate the error propagation along the sliding window decoder of the SC LDPC codes, a partial message reservation (PMR) method is proposed where only the reliable messages generated in previous decoding window are reserved for the next decoding window. We also propose a partial syndrome check (PSC) stopping rule for each decoding window, in which only the complete VNs are checked. Simulation results show that our proposed scheme significantly improves the error floor performance compared to the sliding window decoder with conventional weighted bit-flipping (WBF) algorithm.
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10 - Information Coupled Polar Codes

Xiaowei WuLei YangJinhong Yuan
School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications, University of New South Wales
Abstract: We propose a new class of spatially coupled polar codes, namely information coupled (IC) polar codes, to improve the error performance of finite length polar codes. In the proposed IC-polar codes, every two consecutive polar code blocks (CBs) in a frame are coupled by sharing a few information bits. We optimize the indices of coupling information so that the less reliable information bits in each CB can obtain more reliable messages from the consecutive CBs during decoding. A feed-forward feed-back decoding scheme is proposed. Simulation results show that the proposed IC-polar codes achieve a considerable gain over the uncoupled counterparts for variable code rates with a slightly increased decoding complexity.
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11 - On Uplink Channel Estimation for Massive MIMO under Line-of-Sight channels

Anand SivamalaiRajitha SenanayakeJamie S. Evans
The University of Melbourne
Abstract: Massive multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) technology will be an integral part of next generation networks, promising to bring significant improvements in spectral efficiency. Given the large number of antenna elments at the base-station (BS) required for massive MIMO, we examine some of the available channel estimation methods that exploit the spatial correlation between the elements of the antenna array under pure LoS and Rician channel models. Under these models we present a highly efficient assisted linear minimum mean estimator (A-LMMSE) which is able to estimate the desired users channel with a significantly lower mean squared error (MSE) than conventional estimators. We compare the MSE performance of the A-LMMSE estimator to the optimal, but computationally expensive, minimum mean squared error (MMSE) estimator, and to the conventional linear minimum mean squared error (LMMSE) estimator, through simulation for a finite number of BS antennas. We also compare the performance of the LMMSE and A-LMMSE estimators using analytical results for the MSE when the number of BS antennas is infinite.
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12 - Multi-Target Context-Aware Handovers for Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

Hanning Gu1Phee Lep Yeoh2Brian Scott Krongold1
1The University of Melbourne
2The University of Sydney
Abstract: We propose a low-complexity analytical framework for multi-target small cell handovers (HOs) in heterogeneous wireless networks. Our proposed HO framework accurately models important context-aware parameters of small cell size, user equipment (UE) speed, received power filtering and HO failure probability. To avoid load imbalance, we derive a simple HO threshold condition that leverages multiple cell load conditions while also guaranteeing the expected throughput of small cell UEs. Detailed simulation results are provided to highlight the impact of small cell biasing, UE speed, and time-to-trigger (TTT) parameters on the HO performance. We show that the relation between optimal small cell size and UE speed can be used to effectively reduce HOs and improve UE throughput with low complexity.
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13 - Maximum Likelihood Detection for Cooperative Molecular Communication

Yuting Fang1Adam Noel2Nan Yang1Andrew W. Eckford3Rodney A. Kennedy1
1Research School of Engineering, Australian National University
2School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, Canada
3Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, York University, Toronto, Canada
Abstract: In this poster, symbol-by-symbol maximum likelihood (ML) detection is proposed for a cooperative diffusion-based molecular communication (MC) system. In this system, an fusion center (FC) chooses the transmitter’s symbol that is more likely, given the likelihood of the observations from multiple receivers (RXs). We propose three different ML detection variants according to different constraints on the information available to the FC, which enable us to demonstrate trade-offs in their performance versus the information available. The system error probability for one variant is derived in closed form. Numerical and simulation results show that the ML detection variants provide lower bounds on the error performance of the simpler cooperative variants and demonstrate that majority rule detection has performance comparable to ML detection when the reporting is noisy.
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14 - Uplink Coverage Performance of an Underlay Drone Cell for Temporary Events

Xiaohui Zhou1Jing Guo1Salman Durrani1Halim Yanikomeroglu2
1Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University
2Department of System and Computer Engineering, Carleton University, Canada
Abstract: Using a drone as an aerial base station (BS) to provide coverage to users on the ground is envisaged as a promising solution for beyond fifth generation networks. While the literature to date has examined downlink cellular networks with aerial BSs, we consider an uplink cellular network with an aerial BS. Specifically, we analyze the use of an underlay drone cell to provide coverage for a temporary event, such as a sporting event or a concert in a stadium. Using stochastic geometry, we derive the analytical expressions for the uplink coverage probability of the BS and the drone. The results are expressed in terms of (i) the Laplace transforms of the interference power distribution at the BS and the drone and (ii) the distance distribution between the drone and an independently and uniformly distributed (i.u.d.) drone user equipment and between the drone and an i.u.d. cellular user equipment. The accuracy of the analytical results is verified by Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that varying the drone height leads to a trade-off between the uplink coverage probability of the BS and the drone. In addition, assuming a quality of service of 90% at the BS, an uplink coverage probability of the drone of over 85% can be achieved, with the drone deployed at or below its optimal height of typically between 250-500 m for the considered setup.
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15 - Clique Based Time-sharing in Tree Networks

Swaroop GopalamStephen V. HanlyPhilip Whiting
School of Engineering, Macquarie University
Abstract: Wireless link scheduling is a well known NP-hard problem in general. Several instances of the problem were identified under which it is polynomial time solvable. A greedy approach to the problem is proposed focussing on networks with special structure. The algorithm shares time among the links in a network, where the fraction of time allocated to a link only depends on the links in its local neighbourhood. The performance of the algorithm is investigated by studying the fluid scaled processes of the queueing model. The optimality of the algorithm is shown using the limits of these processes. We show that the algorithm can stabilize the network for any point in the stability region. Traditional CSMA based algorithms although have been shown to be throughput optimal, are notorious for their bad delay performance. We derive the delay results for the algorithm using an example network and compare it to the CSMA algorithm. The algorithm has an application in the control of the ABS (Almost Blanking Subframes) scheme in Heterogeneous networks (HetNet). We discuss how the algorithm can be implemented to dynamically adapt the ABS slot allocations in a two tier HetNet.
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16 - State estimation in power systems when measurements are delayed or lost

Imran Mohammed1Ketan Rajawat2Swapnil Shinde2JG Sreenath2
1Macquarie University
2IIT Kanpur
Abstract: State Estimation plays a crucial role in energy management and it also plays a crucial role in transmission system for real time control and monitoring. Traditional state estimators in power systems assumes there is a perfect communication between the measurement and estimator but in real time this assumption no longer valid because of imperfections in communication systems and higher data rates with the installation of PMUs in power systems. If the measurements are delayed, this cannot in-corporate in current state and it cannot be discarded because it contains information about the current state. With the incorporation of delayed measurements we can improve the accuracy of current state and future estimates as well. Even though the measurements are randomly delayed because of the time stamps on phasor measurements, we can use the delay information when incorporating the delayed measurements during the estimation process. This research works on the problems how to handle this lost and delayed measurements due to communication failure in state estimation in power systems.
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17 - Fixed-complexity Sphere Decoder for Under-determined MIMO Systems

Mohammad Kazem IzadinasabMohamed Oussama Damen
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Canada
Abstract: In this work, we study the fixed-complexity sphere decoder (FSD) scheme for under-determined multiple-input multiple-output (UD-MIMO) systems. It has been reported in the literature that the FSD scheme and the conventional SD-based schemes fail to work for UD-MIMO systems due to the rank deficiency of the channel Gram matrix. We propose a scheme based on the augmented channel matrix which makes the corresponding Gram matrix a full-rank one. The optimal diversity order of the proposed modified FSD scheme for UD-MIMO systems is verified by analysis. Some computer simulations are provided which corroborates the obtained analytical results.
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18 - A Simplified Coding Scheme for the Memoryless Broadcast Channel with Individual Secrecy

Jin Yeong TanLawrence OngBehzad Asadi
The University of Newcastle
Abstract: This work simplifies an existing coding scheme for the two-receiver discrete memoryless broadcast channel with complementary receiver side information where there is a passive eavesdropper and individual secrecy is required. The existing coding scheme is simplified in two steps by replacing Wyner's secrecy coding with Carleial-Hellman's secrecy coding as well as removing additional randomness in the common satellite codeword. This simplified scheme retains the existing achievable individual secrecy rate region. Not least, the simplified scheme requires fewer message splits and fewer random components.
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